The United States – Worst Developed Country in the World

The United States – Worst Developed Country in the World

The United States of America is considered the best example against capitalism. But the US is not the most capitalist country, in fact it is less capitalist than many other developed nations. It is not the worst developed country in the world because of capitalism… it is the worst developed country in the world because it has the most immoral people, the worst institutions, the worst degree of fundamentalism, and the most powerful and greediest government of all developed countries. In short, from a libertarian perspective and looking objectively at the facts (that is, by a non-American who has no stakes in the results), the United States sucks.

This page is dedicated to proving all of this with hard facts.

 


JUMP TO :
Government power ratings
Economic well-being ratings
Social freedom ratings
Health ratings
Morality ratings
Others
Conclusion
Perhaps you have already seen this web page :http://www.huppi.com/kangaroo/8Comparison.htmStatists sometimes use it to argue against capitalism. However, what they don’t consider is that one specific case does not disprove principles. It is much more likely that there is a problem with the people living in the US than with the laws of nature. Part of my point is to show this.Anyway, the page is on a liberal site, so I don’t trust it one bit. Also, most of their criteria are complete shit. I wanted to research some data of my own and post what I find. This page is the result. It is divided in five categories : government power, economic well-being, social freedom, health and morality.The United States is definitely the worst developed country. Not the worst in the world by a long shot, of course : the United States is still a place where most people would kill to live in. But that’s a statement about the rest of the world, not about the US.

Government power
The first issue is, how big is the government ? The bigger the government, the least freedom people have, and the more they fight against each other to direct the power of the state towards other people. The fact that there is tremendous class and race warfare in the US seems to indicate that the government holds a great deal of power : the facts only prove this. The US government is enormously powerful compared to other developed countries. Its wars – war on drugs, war on terrorism, real wars – has afforded it tremendous power in terms of prison population and military power. Although it does not spend as much money proportionally, it uses its resources to embark in costly national and international wars, which affords it tremendous police power.

Military expenditures as % of GDP (2005)
Source : CIA World Factbook 2005 http://www.odci.gov/cia/publications/factbook/index.html

Japan 1.0%
Switzerland 1.0%
Canada 1.1%
Germany 1.5%
Sweden 1.7%
United Kingdom 2.4%
United States 3.3%

Imprisoned citizens ratio per 100 000
Sources :
(1) UK Home Office (late nineties) http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs/r88.pdf
(2) The Sentencing Project (2004)

Japan (1) 40 (2) 58
Australia (1) 95 (2) 117
Canada (1) 115 (2) 116
United Kingdom (1) 125 (2) 142
United States (1) 645 (2) 726

Death sentences
Source : Amnesty International (2004) http://web.amnesty.org/pages/deathpenalty-sentences-eng

Canada, Sweden, Germany, Switzerland, United Kingdom NONE
Japan (various sources) 2
United States 59

Government spending in % of GDP (2005)
Source : 2005 Index of Economic Freedom http://www.heritage.org/research/features/index/ , citing the OECD

United States 15.5%
Switzerland 15.8%
Japan 17.5%
Germany 19.3%
United Kingdom 21.1%
Canada 21.3%
Sweden 28.3%

Corporate warfare
I’m afraid I can’t find data for all countries on this one… all I have is the following. According to these sites :
http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=1274
http://www.fraserinstitute.ca/shared/readmore.asp?sNav=nr&id=508

US corporate welfare budget is 87 billion $US a year, and Canada is 6.3 billion $CAN, which is 5.2 billions $US. Given each country’s population, we get corporate welfare per capita of :

US : 295$
Canada : 162$

If the US is twice as much as Canada, then it must be pretty bad.

Economic well-being
Our second question is, how well off are people in the US ? Well, the Index of Human Progress indicates that American citizens have excellent access to technology such as televisions, telephones and mobile phones, and we can attribute this to their economic freedom in the past. However, nowadays the US has the highest rate of absolute poverty, high inflation, high protectionism, lower-than-average education (the cornerstone of economic growth) and an average tax burden. The influence of the religious, corporatist, class-based institutions of the US is now full-blown. In general, even though the American economy is still very strong, the economic well-being of Americans is bad compared to other developed nations. This category, and the one before, dispels the myth that the US is more capitalist than other developed nations.

Index of Human Progress (2000)
Source : Fraser Institute http://www.fraserinstitute.ca/admin/books/files/hpi-2002.pdf

Switzerland 117.9
Japan 114.7
United States 114.0
Sweden 111.1
Germany 107.1
United Kingdom 106.9
Canada 99.7

Absolute poverty
Sources :
(1) http://www.csls.ca/events/cea01/sharpeilo.pdf
(early nineties, based on 1985 purchasing power parity)
(2) http://www.csls.ca/events/cea01/osberg.pdf
(late nineties, based on 1974/1975 purchasing power parity)
(3) Idem, for poverty intensity index

Japan (1) 4%
Sweden (1) 5% (2) 4.9% (3) 4.9
Canada (1) 6% (2) 9.5% (3) 5.7
Australia (1) 8% (4) 16.2%
United Kingdom (1) 13% (2) 6.4% (3) 4.2
United States (1) 14% (2) 13.7% (3) 8.8

Taxation as % of GDP
Source : http://www.nationmaster.com/graph-T/tax_tot_tax_as_of_gdp , citing the OECD
also see http://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/200/300/fraser/tax_facts11/chapter8.html

Japan 27.1%
United States 29.6%
Switzerland 35.7%
Canada 35.8%
United Kingdom 37.4%
Germany 37.9%
Sweden 54.2%

Approximative top tax rates in %
Source : 2005 Index of Economic Freedom http://www.heritage.org/research/features/index/ , citing the OECD
(1) income tax (2) corporate tax
(3) corporate taxes from http://www.cato.org/pubs/tbb/tbb-0204-3.pdf , citing KPMG “Corporate Tax Rate Survey”, January 2002

Switzerland (1) 35.5% (2) 23% (3) 24.5%
Canada (1) 29% (2) 22.1% (3) 38.6%
United Kingdom (1) 40% (2) 30% (3) 30%
United States (1) 35% (2) 35% (3) 40%
Germany (1) 47% (2) 26% (3) 38.4%
Japan (1) 37% (2) 30% (3) 42%
Sweden (1) 60% (2) 28% (3) 28%

Average tax burden
Source :
(1) Infoplease http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0922307.html Average tax burden, single person without children.
(2) http://www.nationmaster.com/graph-T/tax_tot_tax_wed_sin_wor , citing OECD. Percentage paid in taxes on earnings, single worker without children, average wage.

Japan (1) 16.2% (2) 24.2%
Switzerland (1) 21.5% (2) 29.5%
United Kingdom (1) 23.3% (2) 29.7%
United States (1) 24.3% (2) 30.0%
Canada (1) 25.7% (2) 30.2%
Sweden (1) 30.4% (2) 48.6%
Germany (1) 41.2% (2) 50.7%

Inflation
Sources :
(1) Index of Economic Freedom 2005, weighted average annual rate from 1994 to 2003
(2) http://www.nationmaster.com/graph-T/eco_inf_dur_200, citing various sources (2000-2003)
(3) Inflation of consumer prices, CIA World Factbook 2005

Japan (1) -0.46% (2) -0.8% (3) -0.1%
Switzerland (1) 0.69% (2) 1% (3) 0.9%
Germany (1) 1.26% (2) 1.7% (3) 1.6%
Sweden (1) 1.95% (2) 2.2% (3) 0.7%
United Kingdom (1) 2.51% (2) 2.3% (3) 1.4%
Canada (1) 2.6% (2) 2.6% (3) 1.9%
United States (1) 2.19% (2) 2.5% (3) 2.5%

Average weighted tariff rate (2005)
Source : Index of Economic Freedom 2005

Switzerland 0.8%
Canada 1.1%
United Kingdom, Germany, Sweden 2.4% (EU rate)
United States 2.6%
Australia 3.9%

Minimum wage
Source : Wikipedia
(1) Minimum wage in US dollars (2005)
(2) Percentage of GDP per capita it represents (2005)
(3) deduced from equivalencies from in “A Cross-National Analysis of Minimum Wage Effects”
http://64.233.179.104/search?q=cache:4
kolnKg0s3MJ:www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/feds/2003/200323/200323pap.pdf+minimum+wage+sweden&hl=en

www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/feds/2003/200323/200323pap.pdf+minimum+wage+sweden&hl=en
and Wikipedia data

United States (1) 5.15$ (2) 25%
Japan (3) around 26%
Canada (1) 4.80$-7.00$ (2) 29-41%
Sweden (3) not defined by law, around 42% in practice
United Kingdom (1) 8.53$ in most cases (2) 45%
Switzerland (2) 53%
Germany (3) not defined by law, around 54% in practice

Quality of education
Source : Program for International Student Assessment (2003)
http://www.pisa.oecd.org/document/55/0,2340,en_32252351_32236173_33917303_1_1_1_1,00.html
Also see http://timss.bc.edu/timss1995i/HiLightC.html

Relative rankings in reading (from best to worst) :
1. Canada
2. Japan
3. United Kingdom
4. Sweden
5. United States
6. Switzerland
7. Germany

Relative rankings in mathematics (from best to worst) :
1. Japan
2. Canada
3. Switzerland
4. United Kingdom
5. Sweden
6. United States
7. Germany

Relative rankings in science (from best to worst) :
1. Japan
2. United Kingdom
3. Canada
4. Sweden
5. United States
6. Switzerland
7. Germany

Social freedom
Are Americans socially free ? The US also scores badly in this category. The US has no conscription (although its return has been discussed, so the rating might change soon on this too), but has average freedom of press, high adult ages, no provisions for same-sex marriage except in one state, and very bad corruption. Social freedom in the US is low compared to other developed countries, and may get far worse soon.

Corruption index (lower is more corrupt)
Source : The 2004 Transparency International Corruption Perceptions Index http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0781359.html

Sweden 9.2
Switzerland 9.1
United Kingdom 8.6
Canada 8.5
Germany 8.2
United States 7.5
Japan 6.9

Conscription
Source : http://www.nationmaster.com/graph-T/mil_con , citing many sources

United States, Japan, United Kingdom, Canada NO
Switzerland, Germany, Sweden YES

Freedom of press (higher = less free)
Source :
(1) Press Freedom Survey (2000) http://www.freedomhouse.org/pfs2000/ for broadcast and print (lower = better)
(2) Reporters Without Borders (2004) http://www.rsf.org/article.php3?id_article=11715

Switzerland (1) 8 (2) 0.50
Sweden (1) 11 (2) 2.00
Germany (1) 13 (2) 2.00
Canada (1) 14 (2) 3.33
United States (1) 13 (2) 4.00
Australia (1) 10 (2) 9.50
United Kingdom (1) 20 (2) 6.00
Japan (1) 19 (2) 10.00

Adult ages
(1) Drinking age, from Wikipedia
(2) Age of consent, from Wikipedia
(3) Age of majority, from Interpol http://www.interpol.int/Public/Children/SexualAbuse/NationalLaws/Default.asp

Germany
(1) 16-18 (2) 14-16 in most cases (3) 18
Canada
(1) 18-19 (2) 14 in most cases (3) 17-19
Sweden
(1) 18-20 (2) 15 in most cases (3) 18
Switzerland
(1) 14 (2) 16 (3) 18
United Kingdom
(1) 16-18 (2) 15-17 depending on region (3) 18
United States
(1) 21 (2) 16-18, depending on state (3) 18

Japan
(1) 20 (2) 16-18, depending on prefecture (baseline is 13) (3) 20

Recognition of same-sex marriage
Source : Wikipedia

Canada : Almost all provinces
Germany , Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom : Civil unions only
United States : Seven states recognize civil unions
Japan : None

Marijuana laws – possession
Sources : NORML European Drug Policy, NORML US Federal, Canadian Controlled Drugs and Substances Act

United Kingdom : Six months and L400 fine.
Canada : Up to 1000$ and six months for first arrest, up to 2000$ and one year for subsequent arrests.
Sweden : Depending on the degree, from six months to ten years maximum. Fine can be exchanged for counseling.
United States : 1000$ or more and up to one year for first arrest, up to 5000$ and 3 years for third and subsequent arrests.
Germany : Up to four years.

Health
We now turn to health and health care. It will not come as a surprise that the US’ rating is atrocious, since the wasteful and inefficient nature of American health care is well-known. While once again Americans have access to more health care technology than people in most countries, that technology is not put to good use, and health care is not available to half the population. Here again the problem is not capitalism : countries with private systems and without private systems outperform the US in all indicators.

Infant mortality rate, per thousand
Sources :
(1) http://dll.umaine.edu/ble/U.S.%20HCweb.pdf , citing (1998)
(2) UNICEF (2002) http://childinfo.org/cmr/revis/db1.htm
(3) CIA World Factbook 2005

Sweden (1) 3.5 (2) 3 (3) 2.77
Japan (1) 4.0 (2) 3 (3) 3.26
Germany (1) 4.9 (2) 4 (3) 4.16
Switzerland (1) 4.7 (2) 5 (3) 4.39
Canada (1) 5.2 (2) 5 (3) 4.75
United Kingdom (1) 5.9 (2) 5 (3) 5.16
United States (1) 7.2 (2) 7 (3) 6.5

Under-5 mortality rate, per thousand (2004)
Source : UNICEF http://childinfo.org/cmr/revis/db2.htm

Sweden 3
Japan 5
Germany 5
Switzerland 6
Canada 7
United Kingdom 7
United States 8

Life expectancy
Sources :
(1) http://www.charterhealth.ca/articles/FraserInstitute_2004Report.pdf (2004)
(2) CIA World Factbook 2005 http://www.odci.gov/cia/publications/factbook/index.html

Japan (1) 80.5 (2) 81.2
Switzerland (1) 79.7 (2) 80.4
Sweden (1) 79.5 (2) 80.4
Canada (1) 79.0 (2) 80.1
Germany (1) 77.7 (2) 78.7
United Kingdom (1) 77.4 (2) 78.4
United States (2) 77.7

Road fatalities per million vehicles
Relative ranking from the OECD http://caliban.sourceoecd.org/vl=1908297/cl=27/nw=1/rpsv/factbook/10-04-01-g03.htm (see graph for hard data)
(2) Office of Highway Police Information http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/ohim/hs98/tables/in56.pdf , citing various sources. Deaths per 100 million kilometers
(3) Australian Transport Safety Bureau (1999) deaths per 100 000 people http://www.abs.gov.au/Ausstats/abs@.nsf/Lookup/3875170E8478D171CA256CAE0016268F

Relative ranking, from best to worst :

1. United Kingdom (2) 0.80 (3) 6.0
2. Sweden (2) 0.75 (3) 6.6
3. Switzerland (3) 8.2
4. Australia (3) 9.3
5. Germany (2) 1.45
6. Canada (3) 9.7
7. United States (2) 1.03 (3) 15.3

Mortality amenable to health care, per 100 000
Sources : (1) http://www.fraserinstitute.ca/admin/books/files/HowGoodCdnHealthCareComplete.pdf
(2) Average survival rate rating (lowest = worst) in How Does the Quality of Care Compare in Five Countries ? Hussey et al. http://www.ncqhc.org/conferences/2005presentations/quality_of_care.pdf
(3) Measuring the health of nations: analysis of mortality amenable to health care (Nolte, McKee, 2003) http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/327/7424/1129#SEC3 (1998)

Sweden (1) 79.6 (3) 50.55
Canada (1) 91.8 (2) 112 (3) 62.17
Germany (1) 95.9 (3) 64.15
Japan (1) 81.4 (3) 72.48
United States (2) 105 (3) 80.66
United Kingdom (1) 133.6 (2) 101 (3) 91.10

Morality
What is morality ? This is a very expansive question, but we can say that if a country has the highest crime rates, a high percentage of racism and homophobia, and a high percentage of religion (that is to say, an amoral, polarized, repressive view of other people), then there is a serious problem of morality. And the US definitely has a serious problem of morality. Perhaps these statistics explain all the other ones.

And yes, I know the statists are going to blame the eeeevil guns for these crime rates… but once again this is disproven by the evidence. Countries like Israel, Austria and Switzerland, which have less or equally restrictive gun laws than the US, also have very low homicide rates. This may seem like a revolutionary concept, but moral people don’t tend to shoot each other.

Homicide rate per 100 000
(1) http://www.facts1.com/reasons/usleader.htm , citing Interpol 1984
(2) http://www.guncite.com/gun_control_gcgvintl.html , citing the International Journal of Epidemiology (1998) http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/27/2/214.pdf
(3) Canadian Center for Justice Statistics (2000) http://www.guncontrol.ca/Content/Temp/homicide2000.pdf
(4) Statistics Canada (2000) http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/011218/d011218b.htm

Japan (2) 0.62 (3) 0.5
Germany (2) 1.2
Switzerland (1) 1.1 (2) 1.3 (3) 1.0
United Kingdom (1) 1.1 (2) 1.4 (3) 1.4
Canada (1) 2.7 (2) 2.2 (3) 1.7 (4) 1.8
Sweden (1) 1.4 (2) 1.3 (3) 2.0
United States (1) 7.9 (2) 5.7 (3) 5.5 (4) 5.5

Sexual victimization rate, incidents per 100 000
Sources :
(1) Ministry of Justice New Zealand (1995) http://www.justice.govt.nz/pubs/reports/1995/victimisation/appendix_c.html
(2) http://www.samarthbharat.com/unicristatistics.htm , citing UNICRI International Crime Surveys (1995/1996)
(3) http://www.aic.gov.au/publications/rpp/36/app.pdf (1996)
(4) Idem, percentage of women victimized

United Kingdom (1) 2.1 (2) 2.0 (3) 3.1 (4) 2.0%
United States (1) 2.3 (2) 2.5 (3) 4.9 (4) 2.5%
Canada (1) 3.8 (2) 2.7 (3) 4.8 (4) 2.7%
Sweden (1) 0.9 (2) 2.9 (3) 6.0 (4) 2.9%
Switzerland (2) 9.6 (3) 9.6 (4) 4.6%

Robbery rates per 100 000
Source :
(1) http://www.facts1.com/reasons/usleader.htm
(2) http://www.samarthbharat.com/unicristatistics.htm , citing UNICRI International Crime Surveys (1995/1996)
(3) Ministry of Justice New Zealand (1995) http://www.justice.govt.nz/pubs/reports/1995/victimisation/appendix_c.html

Sweden (1) 44.1 (2) 0.5 (3) 0.3
Switzerland (1) 24.2 (2) 0.9
United Kingdom (1) 44.6 (2) 1.4 (3) 1.1
Canada (1) 92.8 (2) 1.2 (3) 1.2
United States (1) 205.4 (2) 1.3 (3) 1.5

Assaults per 1000
Source : http://www.nationmaster.com/graph-T/cri_ass_cap&int=-1&id=OECD , citing Seventh United Nations Survey of Crime Trends and Operations of Criminal Justice Systems (1998-2000)

Japan 0.33
Germany 1.41
Canada 7.18
United Kingdom 7.5
United States 9.5

Discrimination
Source : Nationmaster
(1) Percentage of people against drug-users
(2) Percentage of homophobia
(3) Percentage of racism
(measured as people being “undesirable neighbours”)

Switzerland (1) 39% (2) 19% (3) 5%
Sweden (1) 68% (2) 15% (3) 5%
Germany (1) 56% (2) 26% (3) 8%
Canada (1) 63% (2) 30% (3) 5%
United States (1) 80% (2) 34% (3) 8%
Japan (1) 91% (2) 69% (3) 11%

Percentage of atheism (defined as lack of belief in God)
Sources :
(1) Atheism: Contemporary Rates and Patterns, Phil Zuckerman http://www.pitzer.edu/academics/faculty/zuckerman/atheism.html
(2) Adherents.com http://www.adherents.com/Na/Na_42.html#314
(3) ReligiousTolerence.org http://www.religioustolerance.org/chr_poll3.htm
(4) Daily Telegraph 2004 survey http://www.yougov.com/archives/pdf/STI040101003_2.pdf
(5) Harris Interactive survey http://www.harrisinteractive.com/harris_poll/index.asp?PID=359
(6) No religions from CIA World Factbook 2005 http://www.odci.gov/cia/publications/factbook/index.html , included to help classification

Japan (1) 64-65%
Sweden (1) 46-85% (2) 8-46%
United Kingdom (4) 35%
New Zealand (1) 20-22%
Canada (1) 19-30% (2) 19% (6) 16%
Australia (1) 24-25% (6) 15.3%
Switzerland (1) 17-24% (6) 8.9%
United States (1) 3-8% (3) 4% (5) 10% (6) 10%

Church attendance as % of population – once per week or more
Sources :
(1) Adherents.com (late nineties)
(2) http://www.religioustolerance.org/rel_rate.htm , citing the Institute for Social Research’s World Values Survey (1990/1991)
(3) Daily Telegraph 2004 survey http://www.yougov.com/archives/pdf/STI040101003_2.pdf
(4) 2005 data from http://pewforum.org/news/display.php?NewsID=4247
Japan (1) 3% (2) 3%
Sweden (1) 4% (2) 4%
Switzerland (2) 16%
United Kingdom (1) 27% (2) 27% (3) 17%
Canada (1) 21% (2) 38% (4) 18%
United States (1) 44% (2) 44% (4) 35%

Others

Voter turnout
Sources :
(1) Population Resource Center http://www.prcdc.org/summaries/voting/voting.html
(2) International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance http://www.idea.int/vt/survey/voter_turnout_pop2.cfm

United States (1) 45% (2) 48.3%
Switzerland (2) 49.3%
Canada (1) 60% (2) 68.4%
Japan (2) 69.0%
United Kingdom (1) 72% (2) 74.9%
Germany (2) 80.6%
Sweden (2) 83.3%

Government debt or overtaxation, 2001-2003
Rankings from the OECD http://thesius.sourceoecd.org/vl=630998/cl=31/nw=1/rpsv/factbook/09-01-01-g01.htm (see graph for hard data)

Relative ranking, from best to worst (lowest debt or overtaxation is best) :

1. Switzerland (overtaxation)
2. Canada (overtaxation)
3. Sweden (overtaxation)
4. United Kingdom (debt)
5. United States (debt)
6. Germany (debt)
7. Japan (debt)

Total social expenditures as share of GDP
Source : Reform Monitor http://www.reformmonitor.org

Japan 13.8%
United States 15.76%
Canada 18.24%
Switzerland 20.97%
United Kingdom 22.52%
Germany 28.01%
Sweden 33.01%

Conclusion
The United States fails all five categories I have listed here, some extremely badly (government power, health, morality), others merely very badly (economic well-being, social freedom). Is the US really the “land of the free” and “the freest country on Earth” ? It might have been before, but not any more.

Based on these relative rankings, I have used the World’s Smallest Political Quiz to roughly locate the US and Canada on a political chart. Here are the results, with the US chart first (generously assuming an average rating for corporate welfare) :

chart4 US

chart2 Canada

Of course, there are other negative factors not listed here, like international and social warfare. The US financed most of its enemies, from the mass-murdering, anti-capitalist Soviets and Nazis to Bolivian drug lords, the fanatical Taliban and dictator Saddam Hussein. The country was born in violence and remains a country tied by the War on Drugs and fundamentalist Christianity, a country of amoral violence in the name of non-existing ideals. The Patriot Act and the Domestic Security Enhancement Act of 2003 ended fair trials, the need of warrants for searches, and permits outright deportation of anyone suspected of supporting terrorists, without a trial. The recent Keto decision has made eminent domain – organized theft of land – into a government priviledge, as long as it’s for the “public good”.

I’m sure I’ll get some hate mail for this, so let me conclude once again : the United States is not, by far, as bad as any third-world dictatorship. But is it the best country in the world ? No. Does it rank anywhere near most developed countries ? No. The US sucks.

For the sake of further comparison, here are summary tables for each country.

United States
Government Power
ATROCIOUS
– Military expenditures (rock-bottom)
– Imprisoned citizens ratio (hideously high)
– Death sentences (rock-bottom)
– Government spending (best)
– Corporate welfare (bad)
Economic well-being
BAD
– Index of Human Progress (good)
– Absolute poverty (last place)
– Taxation (good)
– Top tax rates (average)
– Average tax burden (average)
– Inflation (last place)
– Tariff rate (bad)
– Minimum wage (best)
– Quality of education (bad)
Social freedom
BAD
– Corruption index (second-to-last)
– Conscription (good)
– Freedom of press (average)
– Adulthood (bad)
– Same-sex marriage (bad)
Health
ATROCIOUS
– Infant mortality rate (rock-bottom)
– Under 5 mortality rate (rock-bottom)
– Life expectancy (last place)
– Road fatalities (last place)
– Mortality amendable to health care (bad)
Morality
ATROCIOUS
– Homicide rate (hideously high)
– Sexual victimization rate (good)
– Robbery rate (last place)
– Assaults (rock-bottom)
– Discrimination (bad)
– Percentage of atheism (rock-bottom)
– Church attendance (rock-bottom)
Canada
Government Power
BETTER THAN AVERAGE
– Military expenditures (good)
– Imprisoned citizens ratio (average)
– Death sentences (good)
– Government spending (pretty bad)
– Corporate welfare (good)
Economic well-being
LOWER THAN AVERAGE
– Index of Human Progress (worst)
– Absolute poverty (average)
– Taxation (average)
– Top tax rates (good)
– Average tax burden (average)
– Inflation (bad)
– Tariff rate (excellent)
– Minimum wage (best)
– Quality of education (good)
Social freedom
VERY GOOD
– Corruption index (average)
– Conscription (good)
– Freedom of press (average)
– Adulthood (good)
– Same-sex marriage (best)
Health
AVERAGE
– Infant mortality rate (average)
– Under 5 mortality rate (average)
– Life expectancy (average)
– Road fatalities (bad)
– Mortality amendable to health care (above average)
Morality
BAD
– Homicide rate (bad)
– Sexual victimization rate (average)
– Robbery rate (bad)
– Assaults (average)
– Discrimination (average)
– Percentage of atheism (average)
– Church attendance (bad)
Sweden
Government Power
BAD
– Military expenditures (pretty bad)
– Death sentences (good)
– Government spending (worst)
Economic well-being
BAD
– Index of Human Progress (average)
– Absolute poverty (good)
– Taxation (rock-bottom)
– Top tax rates (worst)
– Average tax burden (bad)
– Inflation (average)
– Tariff rate (bad)
– Minimum wage (best)
– Quality of education (average)
Social freedom
AVERAGE
– Corruption index (best)
– Conscription (bad)
– Freedom of press (good)
– Adulthood (good)
– Same-sex marriage (average)
Health
THE BEST
– Infant mortality rate (best)
– Under 5 mortality rate (best)
– Life expectancy (good)
– Road fatalities (good)
– Mortality amendable to health care (best)
Morality
THE BEST
– Homicide rate (bad)
– Sexual victimization rate (average)
– Robbery rate (best)
– Discrimination (good)
– Percentage of atheism (good)
– Church attendance (best)
Switzerland
Government Power
VERY GOOD
– Military expenditures (best)
– Death sentences (good)
– Government spending (very good)
Economic well-being
VERY GOOD
– Index of Human Progress (best)
– Taxation (average)
– Top tax rates (best)
– Average tax burden (good)
– Inflation (excellent)
– Tariff rate (best)
– Minimum wage (very bad)
– Quality of education (bad)
Social freedom
LOWER THAN AVERAGE
– Corruption index (excellent)
– Conscription (bad)
– Freedom of press (best)
– Adulthood (average)
– Same-sex marriage (average)
Health
AVERAGE
– Infant mortality rate (average)
– Under 5 mortality rate (average)
– Life expectancy (good)
– Road fatalities (average)
Morality
AVERAGE
– Homicide rate (average)
– Sexual victimization rate (worst)
– Robbery rate (best)
– Discrimination (best)
– Percentage of atheism (bad)
– Church attendance (average)

 

 

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